Study: Coconut Oil a Healthy Saturated Fat – But the FDA Prohibits the use of “Healthy” in Describing Coconut Oil

Recently we covered a study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition which compared peanut oil consumption with coconut oil consumption among healthy men in India, where those who consumed coconut oil had better health outcomes in terms of heart disease and diabetes. (See: Coconut oil consumption improves fat-free mass, plasma HDL-cholesterol and insulin sensitivity in healthy men with normal BMI compared to peanut oil.) A researcher at The University of Edinburgh Medical School wrote a Letter to the Editor of Clinical Nutrition commenting on this study, criticizing current government nutritional guidelines regarding saturated dietary fat restrictions. "The cross-over study by Korrapati et al. detailed the potential cardioprotective effect of coconut oil, and I would like to thank the authors for their insight. Whilst the sample size was small, it was well-designed to investigate its primary end-points. This study is particularly topical as, despite removal of the maximum dietary fat intake restriction from guidelines, a major resistance against saturated fats remains." Setting aside the issue of whether or not saturated fats should be restricted at all, given the abundance of contrary evidence in the medical literature, the Edinburgh Medical School researcher reported that such guidelines do not distinguish between different types of saturated fats. Saturated fats can be found in animal products, such as butter, as well as plant sources, such as coconuts and date palms. "The rise in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) with coconut oil consumption is certainly a compelling finding. Results from a recent and larger-scale randomised trial by Khaw et al. corroborate this... Evidence suggests that the saturated versus unsaturated distinction of fats is likely an oversimplification. Korrapati et al. should, therefore, be commended on their focus on the biological properties of coconut oil, particularly the medium chain triglyceride (MCT) dominated fatty acid profile, which may confer atheroprotective effects."

As Pharma Anti-fungal Drugs Fail, Is Coconut Oil Best Defense for New Deadly “Mystery Infection?”

Headlines in the corporate-sponsored "mainstream" media recently warned the public about a new "mysterious infection" that is drug-resistant. As a recent NY Times Health Section article reported, there is allegedly a hospital cover-up of an emerging candida fungus, Candida or C. auris. It is the latest antimicrobial drug-resistant "super-bug" to emerge in hospitals and nursing homes. This time it's not about bacteria, it's a virulent form of candida. And while the corporate media, sponsored in a large degree by Big Pharma, will almost never report on natural solutions, there is hope for fighting fungal infections like Candida where drugs have failed. One of the most beneficial natural products that fights and kills strains of Candida, according to peer-reviewed research over the past several years, is coconut oil.

Latest Alzheimer’s Blockbuster Drug Fails to Complete Phase 3 Trials

As has been reported numerous times here at Health Impact News for the past 6 years or so, the pharmaceutical industry has been desperate to find an Alzheimer's drug to market to an aging baby boomer population with ever increasing numbers of Alzheimer's Disease cases. And yet, billions of dollars have been invested in potential drugs only to see these drugs never make it out of the trial phase and come to market, because they do not significantly help Alzheimer's patients. Biogen and their partner Eisai are the latest pharmaceutical companies to throw in the towel regarding their Alzheimer's drug aducanumab, which has failed to make it out of phase 3 trials. Many drug researchers have now abandoned the theory of amyloid plaque accumulation in the brain as the causative factor of Alzheimer’s. Could aducanumab's failure be the last nail in the coffin for this theory, as natural approaches to Alzheimer's such as coconut oil and the ketogenic diet see more positive results?

Study: Dietary Coconut Oil Leads to Healthy Skin – Reduces Skin Infection and Inflammation

A new study out of Japan and published in the European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology shows how switching the dietary oil of chow fed to mice from soybean oil to coconut oil reduced skin inflammation. The skin healing properties of coconut oil, especially virgin coconut oil, applied topically to the skin have been known for a long time. Even though coconut oil is sold as a dietary oil, people applying it topically are seeing tremendous results for their skin conditions such as acne, eczema, keratosis polaris, psoriasis, rosacea, and fungal infections. We have suspected for years that the reason people in tropical climates who eat their traditional diets which are high in the saturated fats of coconut oil had such beautiful skin, even though they are exposed to the sun to a greater degree than westerners, is because of the high amounts of coconut oil in their diet, which does not oxidize and cause free radical damage as polyunsaturated fats do. Skin cancer, for example, is almost unheard of in tropical climates like the Philippines, but common in western nations, even in colder climates with far less exposure to the sun. Researchers in Japan apparently wanted to test this theory of dietary coconut oil reducing allergic skin inflammation in the laboratory: "Coconut oil is used as a dietary oil worldwide, and its healthy effects are recognized by the fact that coconut oil is easy to digest, helps in weight management, increases healthy cholesterol and provides instant energy. Although topical application of coconut oil is known to reduce skin infection and inflammation, whether dietary coconut oil has any role in decreasing skin inflammation is unknown. In this study, we showed the impact of dietary coconut oil in allergic skin inflammation by using a mouse model of contact hypersensitivity (CHS)."

Research Shows High-Fat Low-Carb Diet with Coconut Oil Can Prevent or Cure Alzheimer’s

A very recent review on nutritional approaches toward preventing and reversing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was conducted in Christchurch, New Zealand’s Canterbury University. The results were submitted to the journal Nutrition. It’s title: "The ketogenic diet as a potential treatment and prevention strategy for Alzheimer's disease." After analyzing 33 studies researching AD and other neurological disorders handled with a ketogenic diet and supplementing coconut oil, the University of Canterbury review analysis concluded: "In this review, we hypothesize that the ketogenic diet could be an effective treatment and prevention for Alzheimer's disease, but both ketone production and carbohydrate restriction may be needed to achieve this."

Use of Coconut Oil as Enema Saves Woman’s Colon from being Surgically Removed due to Colitis After Drugs Failed

A new case study out of Germany just published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology documents the remarkable recovery of a woman who was recommended to have part of her colon removed, including her anus, due to a severe case of Crohn's disease and complicated by diversion colitis. She refused to have a proctectomy (to surgically remove a portion of her colon along with her anus) as recommended by her doctors, and requested a natural approach instead. Therefore, her doctors started daily local administration of three and half ounces of prewarmed coconut oil as a rectal enema. The patient saw immediate results within one week, and after 12 weeks, she was free of pain and returned to work.

As Alzheimer’s Drugs Continue to Fail, Researchers Search for Reasons Why Coconut Oil Cures Alzheimer’s

A group of New York City’s Mt. Sinai Medical School researchers set out to analyze why and how coconut oil affects Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients favorably. They acknowledged some efficacy from coconut oil, and they wanted to know more. Since most drug trials to develop an Alzheimer's drug have failed miserably, the motivation to study coconut oil in order to understand how it positively affects AD was probably motivated by a desire to patent a new drug that could work similar to coconut oil, a natural food that cannot be patented. Their research was based on earlier animal studies of virgin coconut oil’s effect on mouse models of coconut oil as well as other in vitro (lab culture) studies. The researchers also acknowledged the existence of many anecdotal testimonies of AD (Alzheimer’s disease) patients. The Mt. Sinai report was published in the journal Science Direct, Brain Research with the title: Coconut oil decreases expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and secretion of amyloid peptides through inhibition of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1).

Study: Virgin Coconut Oil Improves the Microbiome and Fights Diabetes

A new study published in the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition on August 31, 2018, with the title Beneficial Effect of Virgin Coconut Oil on Alloxan-Induced Diabetes and Microbiota Composition in Rats adds further proof that virgin coconut oil is a powerful remedy for diabetes. In this latest study, virgin coconut oil was shown to be beneficial to the microbiome by increasing probiotic bacteria, leading to better outcomes for those suffering with diabetes. This new research confirms what many have reported to us over the past 15 plus years, that virgin coconut oil is beneficial in overcoming both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. This new study offers a possible explanation as to how virgin coconut oil helps people with Type 1 diabetes without directly affecting insulin levels.

Why Coconut Oil, or Any Saturated Fat, Cannot Raise Cholesterol Levels (LDL levels)

Scottish medical doctor, Malcolm Kendrick, has just written a brilliant expose on his blog explaining, scientifically, why it is impossible for saturated fats to raise LDL cholesterol levels. As I have written many times over the years, this is the kind of information that can save your life and help you make wise dietary choices, but it is information that the U.S. government, Big Pharma, and the corporate-sponsored "mainstream" media cannot afford to publish. Because to do so would be to admit guilt in one of the biggest medical scams of all time: the lipid theory of heart disease. This theory, which has been proven scientifically to be false, has been an economic success for cholesterol-lowering statin medical drugs, the most profitable class of medical drugs all time. This theory also promotes the low-fat diet which encourages consumption of carbohydrates from U.S. subsidized crops, as well as polyunsaturated oil, also derived from U.S. subsidized crops. This theory of heart disease, which condemns cholesterol and saturated fat, has probably been responsible for many millions of people's early deaths and the life-long suffering of autoimmune diseases for an entire generation.

More Research Published Supporting Coconut Oil’s Claim to Heal Alzheimer’s Disease

In May, 2018, I wrote about a new study published in Iran that looked at the "neuroprotective effects" effects of virgin coconut oil for Alzheimer's patients. The title of the study is Virgin coconut oil (VCO) by normalizing NLRP3 inflammasome showed potential neuroprotective effects in Amyloid-β induced toxicity and high-fat diet fed rat and was published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology. While we have been publishing reports of coconut oil reversing the symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease and other neurological diseases for several years now, we believe this was the first peer-reviewed study to actually look at some of the mechanisms of how coconut oil benefits Alzheimer's patients. Now, a second peer-reviewed study has been published here in 2018 looking at the mechanisms of how coconut oil positively affects Alzheimer's patients. Published in the journal, Neurochemical Research, researchers in Japan examined the effects of lauric acid, the most predominant medium chain fatty acid found in coconut oil, on activated microglia in mice. Coconut oil is nature's richest source of lauric acid at about 50% of its composition, and human breast milk comes in a distant second at around 6% lauric acid. The title of the study is Lauric Acid Alleviates Neuroinflammatory Responses by Activated Microglia: Involvement of the GPR40-Dependent Pathway.