Research Continues to Confirm Coconut Oil’s Healing Properties for Diabetes

When we published our book on Virgin Coconut Oil back in 2004, we devoted a whole chapter to diabetes, based on research and testimonials from coconut oil consumers. That chapter also exists as an article on the CoconutOil.com website. The article has testimonials for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Peer-reviewed published research here in 2017 continues to confirm that coconut oil is the dietary oil of choice for those who suffer from diabetes.

Study: Coconut Oil Offers Protection Against Inflammation and Diabetes

Forty percent of women today are obese. Many believe obesity is a precursor to diabetes, which if not reversed will lead to further health complications, and even be life threatening. However, a recent study looking at the effects of coconut oil on glycemia and inflammation demonstrated that obesity alone may not be the culprit. What the researchers discovered indicates that inflammation has a greater impact on insulin resistance and high blood sugar than excess fat. This could be argued, since adipose fats do release toxins over time that do create inflammation. But there are diabetes 2 patients who are not obese. Obesity in women has also been considered a factor in infertility, which this study also attempted to determine. Inadvertently, the study’s findings disclosed even more about the health protective qualities of coconut oil.

Virgin Coconut Oil Helps Reduce Diabetes

A new study from India published in the Journal of Food Science Technology showed positive results in improving glucose metabolism in high fructose diets in rats. Coconut oil is a common dietary oil in South India, so the researchers wanted to compare the common refined copra-based coconut oil found in the market place with the less-refined "virgin" coconut oil which has become more readily available in recent years. The results were very promising. The researchers found that glucose metabolism only increased 17% in a high-fructose diet as compared to 46% for those rates fed a standard coconut oil diet. This research confirms what we have observed over the years since we brought Virgin Coconut Oil into the U.S. market: many who switch to Virgin Coconut Oil see their blood sugar levels normalize. Here are some testimonials.

Saturated Fat Helps Avoid Diabetes

About one in three Americans now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. That's nearly 80 million people, the majority of whom suffer from type 2 diabetes – a preventable and, often, reversible condition. The problem is that many Americans are unaware that the foods they're eating could be setting them up for a dietary disaster, and this isn't their fault. Public health guidelines condemn healthy fats from foods like butter and full-fat dairy and recommend whole grains and cereals – the opposite of what a person with diabetes, or any person really, needs to stay healthy. For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50 to 60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs! Research, including a new study involving dolphins, again suggests that this movement away from traditional full-fat foods is contributing to the rising rates of diabetes and metabolic syndrome across the globe.

The Major Role Soybean Oil Plays in Obesity and Diabetes

Mice fed soybean oil had significant increases in weight gain, body fat, diabetes, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance compared to those fed coconut oil. The soybean-oil diet was also found to upregulate genes involved in obesity, diabetes, inflammation, mitochondrial function, and cancer. In one study when heart-disease patients replaced saturated animal fats with omega-6 vegetable oils like soybean oil it led to an increased risk of death.

Study: Soybean Oil Linked to Obesity and Diabetes More than Coconut Oil and Fructose

Scientists in California published a study investigating the effects of saturated versus unsaturated fat in the diets of mice, as well as fructose, on obesity and diabetes. The unsaturated fat was soybean oil, and the saturated fat was coconut oil, along with a fructose. Soybean oil came out the clear loser when looking at the dietary effect on obesity and diabetes.

Another Study Shows Strong Link Between Cholesterol-lowering Statin Drugs and Diabetes

Another study has confirmed that statin drug use increases one's chance of developing diabetes. Statin drugs are the all-time leading prescription drugs sold in the U.S. and around the world, prescribed by doctors to lower people's cholesterol levels. It is estimated that one out of every 4 people in the United States over the age of 50 is currently taking statin drugs for cholesterol. This current study just published looked at 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system. They found that those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The study was published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. This just the latest study to link statin drugs to diabetes, especially in women. Studies published in 2014 caused over 2000 lawsuits to be filed against Pfizer, the maker of the best-selling drug of all-time, Lipitor.

Are the Government’s Dietary Guidelines Making Us Obese?

Since the early 1980′s the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans have urged trusting Americans to eat a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet for their health and weight control. Now, obesity rates have shot up to 30%, and more than 70% of Americans are overweight.

The Positive Effects of Low Carbohydrate and High Saturated Fat Diets on Diabetes

The foundation to the lipid theory of heart disease is crumbling as real science shows no relationship between saturated fat consumption and cardiovascular disease.